Shoe of the Month-It’s Not Easy Being Green!

It’s Not Easy Being Green!

These limited edition Adidas Originals Kermit the Frog trainers were part of the 2005 relaunch of Adidas’ Adicolor range. The original 1983 Adicolor range were white trainers that were sold with special quick drying pens to allow the wearer to customise their footwear. This individuality and the innovative designs created led to their cult status.

The 2005 range continues the humour and quirkiness of the concept by collaborating with a group of artists and pop culture icons, like Kermit.

Kermit the frog trainers

Kermit the frog trainers

 

 

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Chalk Carvings

Chalk Carvings 

Chalk Carvings

Chalk Carvings

 

 

Chalk Carvings

Chalk Carvings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northamptonshire regimental badges carved from chalk at Hulluch by soldiers of the 1st Battalion during the Battle of Loos in 1915. Measurements: H:6.9cm, L:11.2cm

The Battle of Loos took place in France between 25 September and 13 October and involved approximately 100,000 British soldiers. It was the first engagement where British forces used poison gas against enemy troops. The intention was to use chlorine gas against the German soldiers, but due to inadequate tools and adverse weather conditions, the operation resulted in injury to numerous British troops. The 1st Battalion of the Northamptonshire Regiment were prepared to advance against the enemy after the release of the gas cylinders, but were compelled to push back due to a gas cloud stalling their approach and injuring many soldiers.

The village of Hulluch was positioned close to Loos, which was an industrial area containing slag heaps and mines. The chalk for these carvings could have been sourced from the local area and created by soldiers during operations in and around Loos. Northern France contained chalk and limestone mines which allowed soldiers and civilians to record their memories and experiences of war. In the examples shown here, soldiers used the chalk to carve the Northamptonshire regimental insignia into the stone.

The crest and number ‘48’ represents the amalgamation of the 48th Northamptonshire Regiment of Foot and the 58th Rutlandshire Regiment of Foot in 1881. The Castle with the inscription ‘Gibraltar’ represents the battle honour earned by the 58th Foot in 1779–1783. The ‘Talavera’ honour was earned by the 48th Foot in 1809 during the Peninsular War.

In 2018, objects like these and many more will be made available online for you to explore through a First World War digital archive. For more information on the Conflict & Community Project please click here.

 

 

Shoe of the Month-A Pair of Grubby Old Boots?

A pair of grubby old boots?

Button Boots

Button Boots

These lovely girl’s button boots from 1890 are a little battered. They are stained, faded and have been squashed.

But underneath the scalloped button holes is a hint of their original beauty.

When new the kid leather of these boots would have been a bright blue with contrasting white glass buttons and pink satin lining. The leather has now faded to dirty cream but the elegant shape of the boots with their rounded square toes, low covered Louis heels and shaped top remains.

Happy New Year from everyone at Northampton Museums and all the best for 2018!

 

Embroidered Silk Postcards

Embroidered Silk Postcards

Embroidered silk postcards were popular items for British soldiers to send home during the First World War. These precious and expensive gifts represented skilled local craftsmanship and contained intricate details and were often sent home for a special occasion such as a birthday or Christmas. Designs varied considerably but usually the postcards featured a patriotic or personal theme and contained bright colours.

Embroidered Silk Postcards

Embroidered Silk Postcards

Embroidered silk postcards, 1914-1915

Northampton Museum holds a framed example of these postcards. The writing in the frame reads ‘Embroidered silk postcards made in Paris during the 1914-18 war. Presented by Mrs D.H. Simmonds in memory of her husband’. There are three cards in this frame: two silk and one smaller paper card. The first silk postcard includes an embroidered badge of the Northamptonshire Imperial Yeomanry and the second silk card has a Christmas theme with holly and three flags representing the allied powers: Russia, Italy and Great Britain. The smaller paper card reads ‘To bring you Luck’.

Many of these silk postcards were produced by civilians in France and Belgium and the popularity with British soldiers supported the craft industry and the local economy in some of the smaller towns and villages.

Many of the silk designs would have been standardised and drafted by a professional. The wording, like ‘Christmas’, would have been swapped according to the occasion and designed to fit within the pre-made card frames to allow them to be posted. The message would then have been written on the back of the card.

The design would have been transferred to silk organdie and then stitched with silk floss. The technique is called ‘silk shading’ and predominately uses satin stitch and long and short stitch. These items would have been stitched by a competent embroiderer, most likely using a hoop and then sold to soldiers to send home.

In 2018, objects like these and many more will be made available online for you to explore through a First World War digital archive. For more information on the Conflict & Community Project please click here.

Further information:

Imperial War Museum: Embroidered Silk Postcards

Shoe of the Month-J’adore Dior

J’adore Dior

These beautiful blue/grey satin court shoes sporting a bow and diamante trim were made under the Christian Dior label for Harrods, London, in about 1955.

Christian Dior is famous for designing the New Look in 1947. Characteristics of this new look were a jacket nipped in at the waist and a wide flowing skirt. A hat, gloves and of course a pair of court shoes with pointed toes and stiletto heels completed the look.

 

J'adore Dior

J’adore Dior

Shoe designer Roger Vivier usually takes the credit for inventing the stiletto heel. As shoe designer to Christian Dior from 1953, Vivier designed bespoke shoes for Dior’s couture collection as well as models for a ready-made series that carried both of their names on the label.

Christmas during the First World War

Christmas during the First World War

 As Christmas fast approaches, most of us are contemplating what gifts to buy our friends and family. During the First World War (1914–1918), many families did not have the money or resources to buy extravagant presents. Those that could spare some pennies tended to purchase British made items including toys, perfume, pens and cigars and these were considered a true luxury during a period of food shortages, price hikes and wartime thrift.

Exchanging presents at Christmas was viewed as an important act. Through all the struggles and hardships of war, Christmas time offered a flicker of happiness and a feeling of hope. Not only was this important on the home front but also on the front line where soldiers maintained military operations throughout the winter months. During 1914, at the age of seventeen, Princess Mary supported a public fundraising campaign to send gifts to the soldiers serving overseas. The Princess Mary Gift Fund box was made of brass and contained a variety of items such as tobacco, sugar candy and a Christmas card.

Princess Mary Gift Fund Box, 1914–1915 

Brass tin containing two packets of cigarettes, tobacco, a printed Christmas card and a bullet pencil case.

Many families shopping for soldiers in Britain searched for practical gifts as opposed to seasonal novelty products. Relatives purchased presents that would be useful to the soldiers such as gloves, lighters, razors, watches and wallets. The leather wallet pictured below is an example of one such item:

Leather Wallet, 1917

Brown leather wallet with fabric and buff leather lining presented as a gift by the Northampton Allied War Fund during Christmas 1917.

In 2018, objects like these and many more will be made available online for you to explore through a First World War digital archive. For more information on the Conflict & Community Project please click here.

Further reading:

Imperial War Museum: Princess Mary Gift Fund 1914 Box and Contents

10 ways Christmas was celebrated during the First World War

Shoe of the Month – Webb’s Wonders

Webb’s Wonders

This classic Oxford shoe was made by the George Webb factory.

George Webb and his two sons, Dennis and Frank established the business in 1927. They manufactured men’s welted footwear at the Mentone Works in Brockton Street, Kingsthorpe Northampton. The works were extended in 1935 and again in 1967. In the 1960s they also opened factories in both Wellingborough and Walgrave.

George Webb made beautiful men’s shoes under the brands of Mentone, Castillo, World-Walk and Savile Row.

Oxford Shoe by Webb's

Oxford Shoe by Webb’s